Edmund Burke Quotes

A populace never rebels from passion for attack, but from impatience of suffering.

Edmund Burke

I know that many have been taught to think that moderation, in a case like this, is a sort of treason.

Edmund Burke

The cold neutrality of an impartial judge.

Edmund Burke

Some decent regulated pre-eminence, some preference (not exclusive appropriation) given to birth, is neither unnatural, nor unjust, nor impolite.

Edmund Burke

It is, generally, in the season of prosperity that men discover their real temper, principles, and designs.

Edmund Burke

It is the interest of the commercial world that wealth should be found everywhere.

Edmund Burke

When the leaders choose to make themselves bidders at an auction of popularity, their talents, in the construction of the state, will be of no service. They will become flatterers instead of legislators; the instruments, not the guides, of the people.

Edmund Burke

The body of all true religion consists, to be sure, in obedience to the will of the Sovereign of the world, in a confidence in His declarations, and in imitation of His perfections.

Edmund Burke

Power gradually extirpates from the mind every humane and gentle virtue. Pity, benevolence, friendship, are things almost unknown in high stations.

Edmund Burke

Adversity is a severe instructor, set over us by one who knows us better than we do ourselves, as he loves us better too. He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves and sharpens our skill.

Edmund Burke

A perfect democracy is therefore the most shameless thing in the world.

Edmund Burke

No passion so effectually robs the mond of all its poers of acting and reasoning as fear.

Edmund Burke

I venture to say no war can be long carried on against the will of the people.

Edmund Burke

Manners are of more importance than laws... Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensible operation, like that of the air we breathe in.

Edmund Burke

But what is liberty without wisdom, and without virtue? It is the greatest of all possible evils; for it is folly, vice, and madness, without tuition or restraint.

Edmund Burke

The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion.

Edmund Burke
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