John Keats Quotes

Nothing ever becomes real till it is experienced; even a proverb is no proverb to you till your life has illustrated it

John Keats

Health is my expected heaven.

John Keats

I have been astonished that men could die martyrs for their religion - I have shudder'd at it. I shudder no more. I could be martyr'd for my religion Love is my religion And I could die for that. I could die for you.

John Keats

Give me women, wine and snuff Until I cry out hold, enough You may do so san objection Till the day of resurrection; For bless my beard then aye shall be My beloved Trinity.

John Keats

A thing of beauty is a joy forever: Its loveliness increases; it will never pass into nothingness.

John Keats

Philosophy will clip an angel's wings.

John Keats

Do not all charms fly at the mere touch of cold philosophy? There was an awful rainbow once in heaven: we know her woof, her texture; she is given in the dull catalogue of common things. Philosophy will clip an angel's wings, conquer all mysteries by rule and line, empty the haunted air, and gnome mine unweave a rainbow.

John Keats

Therefore trust to thy heart, and to what the world calls illusions.

John Keats

Away with old Romance! Away with novels, plots and plays of foreign courts; Away with love-verses, sugar'd in rhyme, the intrigues, amours of idlers; Fitted for only banquets of the night where dancers to late music slide; The unhealthy pleasures, ex

John Keats

O for the gentleness of old Romance, the simple planning of a minstrel's song!

John Keats

Souls of Poets dead and gone, What Elysium have ye known, Happy field or mossy cavern, Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern? Have ye tippled drink more fine Than mine hosts Canary wine?

John Keats

Poetry should surprise by a fine excess and not by singularity, it should strike the reader as a wording of his own highest thoughts, and appear almost a remembrance.

John Keats

Land and sea, weakness and decline are great separators, but death is the great divorcer for ever.

John Keats

Though a quarrel in the streets is a thing to be hated, the energies displayed in it are fine; the commonest man shows a grace in his quarrel.

John Keats

Praise or blame has but a momentary effect on the man whose love of beauty in the abstract makes him a severe critic on his own works.

John Keats

The poetry of the earth is never dead.

John Keats

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