Affectation Quotes

Great cultural changes begin in affectation and end in routine.

Jacques Barzun

One of the best temporary cures for pride and affectation is seasickness; a man who wants to vomit never puts on airs

Josh Billings

Affectation is to be always distinguished from hypocrisy as being the art of counterfeiting those qualities, which we might with innocence and safety, be known to want. Hypocrisy is the necessary burden of villainy; affectation part of the chosen trappings of folly

Samuel Johnson

Affectation proceeds from one of these two causes,--vanity or hypocrisy; for as vanity puts us on affecting false characters, in order to purchase applause; so hypocrisy sets us on an endeavor to avoid censure, by concealing our vices under an appearance of their opposite virtues

Henry Fielding

All affectation is the vain and ridiculous attempt of poverty to appear rich

Johann Kaspar Lavater

A gentleman has ease without familiarity, is respectful without meanness; genteel without affectation, insinuating without seeming art.

Philip Dormer Stanhope

Affectation lights a candle to our defects, and though it may gratify ourselves, it disgusts all others

Johann Kaspar Lavater

Among the numerous stratagems by which pride endeavors to recommend folly to regard, scarcely one meets with less success than affectation, which is a perpetual disguise of the real character by false appearances

Johnson

It is remarkable that great affectation and great absence of it (unconsciousness) are at first sight very similar; they are both apt to produce singularity

Archbishop Richard Whately

Affectation discovers sooner what one is than it makes known what one would fain appear to be

Leszczynski Stanislaus

There Affectation, with a sickly mien, Shows in her cheek the roses of eighteen

Alexander Pope

Among the numerous stratagems by which pride endeavors to recommend folly to regard, there is scarcely one that meets with less success than affectation, or a perpetual disguise of the real character by fictitious appearances

Samuel Johnson

Affectation naturally counterfeits those excellences which are placed at the greatest distance from possibility of attainment, because, knowing our own defects, we eagerly endeavor to supply them with artificial excellence

Samuel Johnson

Paltry affectation, strained allusions, and disgusting finery are easily attained by those who choose to wear them; they are but too frequently the badges of ignorance or of stupidity, whenever it would endeavor to please

Oliver Goldsmith

Great vices are the proper objects of our detestation, smaller faults of our pity, but affectation appears to be the only true source of the ridiculous

Henry Fielding

All affectation; 'tis my perfect scorn; Object of my implacable disgust

William Cowper

I must confess I am a fop in my heart; ill customs influence my very senses, and I have been so used to affectation that without the help of the air of the court what is natural cannot touch me.

Sir George Etherege

Affectation is certain deformity; by forming themselves on fantastic models, the young begin with being ridiculous, and often end in being vicious

Robert Blair

The thing is plain. All that men really understand, is confined to a very small compass; to their daily affairs and experience; to what they have an opportunity to know, and motives to study or practice. The rest is affectation and imposture

William Hazlitt

It is indeed not easy to distinguish affectation from habit; he that has once studiously developed a style, rarely writes afterwards with complete ease

Samuel Johnson

Great cultural changes begin in affectation and end in routine

Jacques Barzun

The man of affectation may, perhaps, be reclaimed, by finding how little he is likely to gain by perpetual constraint and incessant vigilance, and how much more securely he might make his way to esteem, by cultivating real, than by displaying counter

Samuel Johnson

Affectation hides three times as many virtues as charity does sins

Horace Mann

Affectation is a very good word when someone does not wish to confess to what he would none the less like to believe of himself

Georg C. Lichtenberg

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