Good Quotes

That is one good thing about this world. . .there are always sure to be more springs.

Lucy Maud Montgomery

Under all speech that is good for anything there lies a silence that is better. Silence is deep as Eternity; speech is shallow as Time.

Thomas Carlyle

Discretion of speech is more than eloquence; and to speak agreeably to him with whom we deal is more than to speak in good words or in good order.

Francis Bacon, Sr.

The good physician treats the disease; the great physician treats the patient who has the disease

William Osler

A hard beginning maketh a good ending.

John Heywood

Everyone who wants to do good to the human race always ends in universal bullying.

Aldous Huxley

A good conversationalist is not one who remembers what was said, but says what someone wants to remember.

John Mason Brown

The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together.

William Shakespeare

Horse sense is a good judgement which keeps horses from betting on people.

W. C. Fields

Good communication is as stimulating as black coffee, and just as hard to sleep after.

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Bygone troubles are good to tell

Yiddish Proverb

Capitalism is the astounding belief that the most wickedest of men will do the most wickedest of things for the greatest good of everyone.

John Maynard Keynes

Our body is a well-set clock, which keeps good time, but if it be too much or indiscreetly tampered with, the alarm runs out before the hour.

Joseph Hall

Liberalism regards life as an adventure in which we must take risks in new situation, in which there is no guarantee that the new will always be the good or the true, in which progress is a precarious achievement rather than inevitability.

Morris Raphael Cohen

I am not thinking of those shining precepts which are the registered property of every school; that is to say learn as much by writing as by reading; be not content with the best book; seek sidelights from the others; have no favourites; keep men and things apart; guard against the prestige of great names; see that your judgments are your own; and do not shrink from disagreement; no trusting without testing; be more severe to ideas than to actions; do not overlook the strength of the bad cause of the weakness of the good; never be surprised by the crumbling of an idol or the disclosure of a skeleton; judge talent at its best and character at its worst; suspect power more than vice, and study problems in preference to periods.

John Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton
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