Happiness Quotes

Happiness consists not in having much, but in being content with little.

Lady Marguerite Blessington

There is no cosmetic for beauty like happiness.

Lady Marguerite Blessington

Happiness is not a life without pain, but rather a life in which the pain is traded for a worthy price.

Orson Scott Card

Remember happiness doesn't depend upon who you are or what you have; it depends solely on what you think.

Dale Breckenridge Carnegie

I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought; and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.

G. K. Chesterton

Silence accompanies the most significant expressions of happiness and unhappiness: those in love understand one another best when silent, while the most heated and impassioned speech at a graveside touches only outsiders, but seems cold and inconsequential to the widow and children of the deceased.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov

The office of government is not to confer happiness, but to give men opportunity to work out happiness for themselves.

William Ellery Channing

Whoever said money can't buy happiness wasn't spending it helping people who needed it.

Keshia Chante

Middle-class women who entertain the hope or fancy of being something in the world, lose Nature's happiness and miss Society's. They are the most unfortunate creatures I have known.

Nicolas Chamfort

The achievement of happiness requires not the ... satisfaction of our needs ... but the examination and transformation of those needs.

Stanley Louis Cavell

Knowledge is not happiness, and science But an exchange of ignorance for that Which is another kind of ignorance.

George Gordon (Noel) Byron, 6th Baron Byron

Life finds its purpose and fulfillment in the expansion of happiness.

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi

Goodness does not more certainly make men happy than happiness makes them good.

Walter Savage Londor

You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.

Albert Camus

Clever men will recognize and tolerate nothing but cleverness; every authority rouses their ridicule, every superstition amuses them, every convention moves them to contradiction. Only force finds favor in their eyes, and they have no toleration for anything that is not purely natural and spontaneous. And yet ten clever men are not worth one man of talent, nor ten men of talent worth one man of genius. And in the individual, feeling is more than cleverness, reason is worth as much as feeling, and conscience has it over reason. If, then, the clever man is not mockable, he may at least be neither loved, nor considered, nor esteemed. He may make himself feared, it is true, and force others to respect his independence; but this negative advantage, which is the result of a negative superiority, brings no happiness with it. Cleverness is serviceable for everything, sufficient for nothing.

Henri-Frdric Amiel
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