Nature Quotes

If we think systematically, we will stop asking, "How much is nature worth?" We will know that we are a piece of nature ourselves.

Karl-Henrik Robèrt

We can never have enough of nature.

Henry David Thoreau

The major problems in the world are the result of the difference between how nature works and the way people think.

Gregory Bateson

Zoos are becoming facsimiles - or perhaps caricatures - of how animals once were in their natural habitat. If the right policies toward nature were pursued, we would need no zoos at all.

Michael Fox

Man talks of a battle with Nature, forgetting that if he won the battle, he would find himself on the losing side.

E. F. Schumacher

With all our mastery over the powers of Nature we have adhered to the view that the struggle for existence is a permanent and necessary condition of life.

Frederick Soddy

It is not the language of painters but the language of nature which one should listen to, the feeling for the things themselves, for reality is more important than the feeling for pictures.

Vincent Van Gogh

Nature magically suits a man to his fortunes, by making them the fruit of his character.

Emerson, Ralph Waldo

Fortune has something of the nature of a woman. If she is too intensely wooed, she commonly goes the further away.

Charles V

The brave man is not he who feels no fear, For that were stupid and irrational; But he, whose noble soul its fear subdues, And bravely dares the danger nature shrinks from.

Joanna Baillie

Self-preservation, nature's first great law, all the creatures, except man, doth awe.

Andrew Marvell

It is the nature of desire not to be satisfied, and most men live only for the gratification of it.

Aristotle

For the mind disturbed, the still beauty of dawn is nature's finest balm.

Edwin Way Teale

Simplicity is the nature of great souls.

Papa Ramadas

As I was writing about Grace Marks, and about her interlude in the Asylum, I came to see her in context the context of other people's opinions, both the popular images of madness and the scientific explanations for it available at the time. A lot of what was believed and said on the subject appears like sheer lunacy to us now. But we shouldn't be too arrogant how many of our own theories will look silly when those who follow us have come up with something better? But whatever the scientists may come up with, writers and artists will continue to portray altered mental states, simply because few aspects of our nature fascinate people so much. The so-called mad person will always represent a possible future for every member of the audience who knows when such a malady may strike? When "mad," at least in literature, you aren't yourself; you take on another self, a self that is either not you at all, or a truer, more elemental one than the person you're used to seeing in the mirror. You're in danger of becoming, in Shakespeare's works, a mere picture or beast, and in Susanna Moodie's words, a mere machine; or else you may become an inspired prophet, a truth-sayer, a shaman, one who oversteps the boundaries of the ordinarily visible and audible, and also, and especially, the ordinarily sayable. Portraying this process is deep power for the artist, partly because it's a little too close to the process of artistic creation itself, and partly because the prospect of losing our self and being taken over by another, unfamiliar self is one of our deepest human fears.

Margaret Eleanor Atwood
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