Prejudices Quotes

The greatest and noblest pleasure which we have in this world is to discover new truths, and the next is to shake off old prejudices.

Frederick The Great

Prejudices are the chains forged by ignorance to keep men apart.

Countess of Blessington

Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrities. The latter cannot understand it when a man does not thoughtlessly submit to hereditary prejudices but honestly and courageously uses his intelligence.

Albert Einstein

Education is a method whereby one acquires a higher grade of prejudices.

Laurence J. Peter

The prejudices of men emanate from the mind, and may be overcome; the prejudices of women emanate from the heart and are impregnable.

Jean Baptiste de Boyer

Prejudices are the props of civilization.

Andre Gide

People have prejudices against a nation in which they have no acquaintances.

Philip Gilbert Hamerton

Every period of life has its peculiar prejudices; whoever saw old age, that did not applaud the past, and condemn the present times?

Michel Eyquem de Montaigne

The multitude are ruled by prejudices.

Voltaire

The greatest and noblest pleasure which men can have in this world is to discover new truths; and the next is to shake off old prejudices.

Frederick The Great

I am free of all prejudices. I hate every one equally.

W. C. Fields

Prejudices, it is well known, are most difficult to eradicate from the heart whose soil has never been loosened or fertilized by education; they grow there, firm as weeds among stones.

Charlotte Bronte

Prejudices are rarely overcome by argument; not being founded in reason they cannot be destroyed by logic.

Tryon Edwards

Education is the process of driving a set of prejudices down your throats.

Martin H. Fischer

Words are not deeds. In published poems we think first of Eliot's "Jew", words edge closer to deeds. In Cline's anti-Semitic textbooks, words get as close to deeds as words can well get. Blood libels scrawled on front doors are deed. In a correspondence, words are hardly even words. They are soundless cries and whispers, "gouts of bile," as Larkin characterized his political opinions, ways of saying, "Gloomy old sod, aren't I?" Or more simply, "Grrr." Correspondences are self-dramatizations. Above all, a word in a letter is never your last word on any subject. There was no public side to Larkin's prejudices, and nothing that could be construed as a racist the word suggest a system of thought, rather than an absence of thought, which would be closer to the reality, closer to the jolts and twitches of self response.

Martin Amis
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