Time Quotes

[Travel seems] not just a way of having a good time, but something that every self-respecting citizen ought to undertake, like a high-fiber diet, say, or a deodorant.

Jan Morris

You know it's time to diet when you push away from the table and the table moves.

Quoted in The Cockle Bur

I'm allergic to food. Every time I eat it breaks out into fat.

Jennifer Greene Duncan

The time to quit is before you wish you had.

Kimberly K. Jones

Time and space - time to be alone, space to move about - these may well become the great scarcities of tomorrow

Edwin Way Teale

If I had a rose for every time I thought of you, I'd be picking roses for a lifetime.

Swedish Proverb

What fools indeed we morals are To lavish care upon a Car, With ne'er a bit of time to see About our own machinery!

John Kendrick Bangs

Each year it seems to take less time to fly across the ocean and longer to drive to work.

Unknown

There came a time when the risk to remain tight in the bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.

AnaÔs Nin

You know, a long time ago being crazy meant something. Nowadays everybody's crazy.

Charles Manson

One doesn't discover new lands without consenting to lose sight of the shore for a very long time.

Andre Gide

We have what we seek. It is there all the time, and if we give it time it will make itself known to us.

Thomas Merton

In the interests of research I have walked on many battlefields that once were liquid with pulped mens bodies and spangled with exploded shells and splayed bone. All of them have been green again by the time I got there. Each has inspired a few good quotes in its day. Sad marble angels brood like hens over the grassy nests where nothing hatches.

Margaret Eleanor Atwood

Everyone who achieves success in a great venture, solves each problem as they came to it. They helped themselves. And they were helped through powers known and unknown to them at the time they set out on their voyage. They keep going regardless of the obstacles they met.

W. Clement Stone

As I was writing about Grace Marks, and about her interlude in the Asylum, I came to see her in context the context of other people's opinions, both the popular images of madness and the scientific explanations for it available at the time. A lot of what was believed and said on the subject appears like sheer lunacy to us now. But we shouldn't be too arrogant how many of our own theories will look silly when those who follow us have come up with something better? But whatever the scientists may come up with, writers and artists will continue to portray altered mental states, simply because few aspects of our nature fascinate people so much. The so-called mad person will always represent a possible future for every member of the audience who knows when such a malady may strike? When "mad," at least in literature, you aren't yourself; you take on another self, a self that is either not you at all, or a truer, more elemental one than the person you're used to seeing in the mirror. You're in danger of becoming, in Shakespeare's works, a mere picture or beast, and in Susanna Moodie's words, a mere machine; or else you may become an inspired prophet, a truth-sayer, a shaman, one who oversteps the boundaries of the ordinarily visible and audible, and also, and especially, the ordinarily sayable. Portraying this process is deep power for the artist, partly because it's a little too close to the process of artistic creation itself, and partly because the prospect of losing our self and being taken over by another, unfamiliar self is one of our deepest human fears.

Margaret Eleanor Atwood

Quote of the Day

Social Media
Our Partners