Words Quotes

So when you are listening to somebody, completely, attentively, then you are listening not only to the words, but also to the feeling of what is being conveyed, to the whole of it, not part of it.

Jiddu Krishnamurti

One great use of words is to hide our thoughts


Love is shown in your deeds, not in your words.

Fr. Jerome Cummings

Men of few words are the best men.

William Shakespeare

Words may show a man's wit but actions his meaning.

Benjamin Franklin

Wisdom is not in words; Wisdom is meaning within words.

Kahlil Gibran

Do not the most moving moments of our lives find us all without words?

Marcel Marceau

Short words are best and the old words when short are best of all.

Winston Churchill

No one has a prosperity so high and firm that two or three words can't dishearten it.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

“In the silence of night I have often wished for just a few words of love from one man, rather than the applause of thousands of people.”

Judy Garland

“Handle them carefully, for words have more power than atom bombs.”

Pearl Strachan Hurd

In the course of my life, I have often had to eat my words, and I must confess that I have always found it a wholesome diet.

Winston Churchill

Bittersweet? No, just bitter, the taste of your tongue. Words you can’t have back, so they linger.

Coco J. Ginger

The deeper the experience of an absence of meaning -- in other words, of absurdity --the more energetically meaning is sought.

Vaclav Havel

As I was writing about Grace Marks, and about her interlude in the Asylum, I came to see her in context the context of other people's opinions, both the popular images of madness and the scientific explanations for it available at the time. A lot of what was believed and said on the subject appears like sheer lunacy to us now. But we shouldn't be too arrogant how many of our own theories will look silly when those who follow us have come up with something better? But whatever the scientists may come up with, writers and artists will continue to portray altered mental states, simply because few aspects of our nature fascinate people so much. The so-called mad person will always represent a possible future for every member of the audience who knows when such a malady may strike? When "mad," at least in literature, you aren't yourself; you take on another self, a self that is either not you at all, or a truer, more elemental one than the person you're used to seeing in the mirror. You're in danger of becoming, in Shakespeare's works, a mere picture or beast, and in Susanna Moodie's words, a mere machine; or else you may become an inspired prophet, a truth-sayer, a shaman, one who oversteps the boundaries of the ordinarily visible and audible, and also, and especially, the ordinarily sayable. Portraying this process is deep power for the artist, partly because it's a little too close to the process of artistic creation itself, and partly because the prospect of losing our self and being taken over by another, unfamiliar self is one of our deepest human fears.

Margaret Eleanor Atwood
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